Structure microservices

Hi, how would you structure a Deno microservice repository with a good developer experience (good debugging, ..., communication using message brokers)? Do you have any example?
DAH
Deno AI Helper52d ago
Hello! I wasn't able to find the answer to your question in the official Deno documentation. However, structuring a microservice architecture can vary widely depending on the specific requirements and preferences of your project. While I can't provide a specific example from the Deno documentation, I can offer some general advice on structuring a Deno microservice repository: 1. Separation of Concerns: Organize your codebase so that each microservice is in its own directory with its own dependencies and mod.ts file. This helps to keep the services loosely coupled and independently deployable. 2. Shared Libraries: If there are common utilities or libraries that multiple services will use, consider creating a shared directory or a separate module that can be imported by the services that need it. 3. Configuration: Use environment variables for configuration to keep your services flexible and environment agnostic. Deno has built-in support for environment variables which can be accessed via Deno.env. 4. Debugging: For a good debugging experience, you can use Deno's built-in tools like deno lint, deno fmt, and the Deno debugger. Make sure to write comprehensive tests using Deno's built-in testing library. 5. Communication: For communication between services using message brokers, you would typically use a third-party library that supports the message broker you're using (e.g., RabbitMQ, Kafka). Make sure the library is compatible with Deno. 6. Documentation: Maintain good documentation for each service, including how to run it, test it, and deploy it. This is crucial for onboarding new developers and maintaining the services over time. Please note that this advice is not based on the Deno documentation, and I would advise you to
DAH
Deno AI Helper52d ago
double-check the accuracy of the advice given. For a more tailored approach, you might want to look at community best practices, patterns, and examples from other Deno projects on platforms like GitHub. Additionally, consider joining the Deno community forums or chat channels where you can discuss and get insights from other developers who have experience with Deno and microservices.